Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

The pattern may be different from the image shown due to the cutting process.

Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

The pattern may be different from the image shown due to the cutting process.

Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

The pattern may be different from the image shown due to the cutting process.

Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

The pattern may be different from the image shown due to the cutting process.

  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)

Regular price
¥7,700 (Tax included.)
Sale price
¥7,700 (Tax included.)
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

Tatsumura Saki products are used by many people who enjoy the tea ceremony. The various beautiful patterns of the textiles add a touch of beauty to tea ceremonies even today. Please enjoy the beauty of the textiles that casually and lustrously decorate the hands of those who handle tea utensils.

Size (cm) : W18.5 x H10.0 x D2.0

More Information

Product Name : Kaishi Paper Container (Tea-things) (Moru-te Kaki-mon)
Product type : Kaishi Paper Container
Size (cm) : W18.5 x H10.0 x D2.0
Related Tags : Packaging Availablein a pocket paperSpring Tea Ceremony Utensilstea utensils
Remark : Please note that the pattern may be different from the picture shown due to the cutting process. Please be forewarned.

Customer Reviews

Product Description

A small clutch bag for tea ceremonies.

Pattern Description

Mo-ru-te Kaki-mon

Out of meibutsu-gire, or specialty cloth, there are fabrics made in Mughal Empire (1526-1858) woven with gold and silver chenille yarns and imported into Japan in the early modern age. Such fabric was called moru in Japan, like gold moru that were woven with gold chenille yarn and silver-moru with silver chenille yarn. Many of their motives were flowering plants and fruits of the tropical area showing a full of exotic atmosphere that are quite different from the designs of donsu, a damask, and kinran, a gold brocade, both of which were imported from China. The design of this warp patterned brocade depicts the tropical flowers placed vertically woven with the golden chenille-like yarn in an exquisite harmony of gynoecia and androecia.